Dr. Tashia Abry is an Assistant Research Professor in the T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics at Arizona State University. She received her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from the University of Virginia in 2012 where she studied school-based social and emotional learning interventions and program implementation. Currently, Tashia’s research focuses on the development of the teacher and child in the classroom ecology. She is interested in classroom structures and processes including teaching practices, interactions, classroom configurations, and school-based interventions that promote the development of the whole child, and understanding the mechanisms underlying such associations. Tashia can be contacted at tashia.abry (at) asu (dot) edu.

Dr. Claire Baker received her Ph.D. in the Educational Psychology – Learning and Development program. Claire is an assistant professor of education at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. During her time at UVa, she studied child development using an ecological systems approach to understand cultural, political, historical, and structural factors that influence educational systems. Her research interests focus on child rearing practices as well as environmental systems and their implications for the health and achievement of ethnic minority children. Currently, she is using the early childhood longitudinal study of kindergartners to investigate the relation between environmental risk, parental involvement and school performance among African American boys in kindergarten. Claire can be contacted at claire.baker (at) unc (dot) edu.

 

Dr. Laura Brock received her Ph.D. in the Interdisciplinary Risk and Prevention in the Education Sciences program after a four-year fellowship with the Institute of Education Sciences training program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education. Her research interests emphasize the development of executive function and classroom social processes. Laura is an Assistant Professor of Teacher Education at the College of Charleston. Laura can be contacted at brockll (at) cofc(dot) edu.

 

 

Dr. Lauren Decker received her PhD in the Interdisciplinary Risk and Prevention in the Education Sciences program from the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education in May 2008. She is now a Researcher with Edvance Research Inc. which currently runs the Regional Educational Laboratory (REL)– Southwest. Lauren currently conducts work on a variety of topics for REL Southwest and other clients, including issues related to district wide intervention systems and the alignment of college readiness standards in mathematics. Lauren can be contacted at ldecker (at) edvanceresearch (dot) com.

 

 

Micela Leis received her PhD in the Educational Psychology: Applied Developmental Science program from the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education in May 2016 as an Institute of Education Sciences pre-doctoral fellow. She is now a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Creative Leadership. After graduating from Tufts University with a B.A. in Child Development, she worked as a classroom teacher for four years. Micela taught in Central America, in rural North Carolina (through Teach for America), and in her home state of Rhode Island. Micela is interested in advancing school change through building trust between teachers and principals. She is especially interested in school interventions that focus on changing school climate.

 

Dr. Lori Nathanson received her Phd in the Risk and Prevention Program in Education Sciences from the University of Virginia in 2009. She worked as a project coordinator for the Early Learning Study during her first years of graduate school. She has strong interests in educational measurement as well as the translation of research to policy. Dr. Lori Nathanson joined the Research Alliance for New York City Schools in 2010 after working with Yale University and the New Line Learning Federation Schools in Maidstone, England.

 

 

Dr. Erin Ottmar received her Ph.D. in is the Educational Psychology: Applied Developmental Science program. Her research interests emphasize the importance of mathematics instructional quality, teacher knowledge, and self-efficacy beliefs in the mathematics classroom. Erin is now a Postdoctoral Research Scientist in the Department of Psychology at the University of Richmond. Erin currently is developing and piloting a middle/high school algebra intervention, Pushing Symbols, which uses an Ipad application to teach and transform the structure of algebra through perceptual movement. In addition, she is mentoring undergraduate students who are interested in educational and psychological research. Erin can be contacted at erin.ottmar (at) richmond (dot) edu.

 

Dr. Christine Patton is a postdoctoral research associate working on the Math Learning Study. Christine conducts fieldwork and oversees the reliability efforts for a measure of observed engagement in math. Her research interests include implementation fidelity, exploring the role of educational contexts on students’ psychosocial development, and qualitative methodology. Christine received her PhD in Educational Psychology from the University of Virginia and her MA in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology from Boston College.

 

 

Carol Paxton received her PhD in the Educational Psychology: Applied Developmental Science program from the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education in May 2016 as an Institute of Education Sciences pre-doctoral fellow. Prior to returning to graduate school, she was a classroom teacher, literacy specialist, and teacher leader in grades K-8 for fifteen years. Carol taught in Virginia, Washington state, Egypt, and her home state of Texas before choosing to pursue a career as a research scientist. Carol holds master’s degrees in Reading Education and Educational Psychology: Applied Developmental Science. Her research interests include support for teachers, socioemotional development, fidelity of implementation, program evaluation, and community service learning.

 

Dr. Holly H. Pinter is an Assistant Professor at Western Carolina University. Her research interests include teacher quality, middle school mathematics education, student discourse practices, and pre-service teacher preparation. Holly received her Ph.D. from the University of Virginia in 2013 and also has a Masters of Arts in Education with a focus on middle grades mathematics instruction. Before entering the doctoral program, Holly taught seventh and eighth grade mathematics for five years in Buncombe County Schools in Asheville, North Carolina.

 

Dr. Temple Walkowiak is an assistant professor of Mathematics Education in the Department of Elementary Education at NC State University. Prior to her studies at UVA, Temple worked as a middle school mathematics teacher, mathematics specialist, and assistant principal. Her research interests include teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge, children’s development of mathematical concepts during upper elementary and middle school, and professional development models that deepen teachers’ conceptual understandings of mathematics.

 

 

Dr. Michelle Yoon received her Ph.D. in the Educational Psychology – Learning and Development program. Michelle is Research Faculty in Medical Education at the UVa Medical School. Some of her academic interest areas include obesity and temperament as developmental risk factors, and how students learn math and science. Prior to coming to the Ph.D. program, Michelle was a college career counselor, and high school counselor.

 

 

Photos of Laura Brock, Christine Patton and Michelle Yoon are courtesy of, Dan Addison, UVa Public Affairs. Photo of Lori Nathanson courtesy of Sarah Cramer, Cramer Photography.